AACAP to serve remote Aboriginal community of Yalata in South Australia

AACAP to serve remote Aboriginal community of Yalata in South Australia

Indigenous Affairs Housing Army Aboriginal Community Assistance Programme
Wednesday, 06 June 2018

Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet

Man in army wear and 3 Aboriginal men and 1 Aboriginal woman stand holding a red and blue flag between them. The flag shows the number 17. In the background is a shelter shed, buildings and trees.

The remote Aboriginal community of Yalata (200 kilometres west of Ceduna in South Australia) has welcomed 150 soldiers to their country. The soldiers are part of the Army Aboriginal Community Assistance Programme (AACAP).

The Welcome to Country saw local residents come together with members of the Alinytjara Wilurara Natural Resources Management (NRM) Board, and representatives from the Army and the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet (PM&C).

The Board includes representatives from each of the Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara, Maralinga Tjarutja and Yalata land areas that span from North West South Australia to the Great Australian Bight.

The soldiers are based in a camp nearby Yalata and will spend the next 4 to 5 months constructing a new staff house, upgrading the road to the local airstrip and upgrading the caravan park.

Also included in the Yalata AACAP project is the building of a new multi-purpose Parent and Children Centre and a covered meeting area.

AACAP is a joint operation to improve environmental health conditions within remote Aboriginal communities. The project involves the Army providing personnel and equipment and is supported through funding provided by PM&C.

AACAP seeks to maximise benefit to Indigenous communities by focusing on a holistic project that enables the Army to make best use of its construction expertise and capability, providing services not normally available in a single project.

Since it was established over 20 years ago, the AACAP program has delivered infrastructure, vocational skills training and healthcare to over 40 remote Indigenous communities across Australia.

A 2017 review of the program found it was a highly regarded and successful initiative.

For more information, see Army Aboriginal Community Assistance Programme.